Harper's Weekly 04/04/1863


IN DIXIE.

Onpage 220 we publish a picture, by Mr. Thomas
Nast, representing the arrival of one of our regi-
ments on a Southern plantation, and their recep-
tion by the ladies and negroes of the plantation.
The picture explains itself. We append, however,
a newspaper extract from an officer's letter in
Dixie:


Heavy planters live all along the road, whose broad
acres extend for miles, and whose aristocratic mansions
show them to be the nabobs of the soil. Long rows of
negro cabins are seen at short distances from the residence,
indicating that the “institution” still flourishes here.
These negroes, in large numbers, men, women, and chil-
dren, come and evince the most comical and unsophisti-
cated manifestations of delight at our appearance. The
older ones bow, and grin, and scrape, and throw themselves
into all sorts of the most ludicrous attitudes. The
younger ones dance and frisk about in high glee. “Gora-
mighty bless you, gemmen—may you live allers!” ex-
claimed a delighted old darkey as we passed yesterday.
At the same time he bowed himself almost to the ground.
These poor creatures are about all the friends we have in
this region. They most willingly give all the information
they have.



ARRIVAL OF A FEDERAL COLUMN AT A PLANTER'S HOUSE IN DIXIE.—[See Page 219.]




BRIGADIER-GENERAL ROBERT B. MITCHELL, COMMANDING AT NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE.




Website design © 2000-2004 HarpWeek, LLC
All Content © 1998-2004 HarpWeek, LLC
Please submit questions to webmaster@harpweek.com